Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera

September 28, 2011 | 0 Comments

Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens – Product Description:

Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR CameraMade to be the tool of choice for serious photographers and semi%2Dprofessionals%2C the EOS 7D features an all%2Dnew 18%2E0 Megapixel APS%2DC size CMOS sensor and Dual DIGIC 4 Image Processors%2C capturing tremendous images at up to ISO 12800 and speeds of up to 8 fps%2E The EOS 7D has a new all cross%2Dtype 19%2Dpoint AF system with improved AI Servo AF subject tracking and user%2Dselectable AF area selection modes for sharp focus no matter the situation%2E The EOS 7D%27s Intelligent Viewfinder%2C an entirely newly%2Ddesigned technology%2C provides 100%25 coverage and displays user%2Dselected AF modes as well as a spot metering circle and on demand grid lines%2E New iFCL Metering with 63%2Dzone dual%2Dlayer metering system uses both focus and color information to provide accurate exposure even in difficult lighting%2E The EOS 7D also captures Full HD video at 30p %2829%2E97 fps%29%2C 24p %2823%2E976 fps%29 and 25p with an array of manual controls%2C including manual exposure during movie shooting and ISO speed selection%2E The EOS 7D features a magnesium alloy body that is dust%2D and weather%2Dresistant and shutter durability of up to 150%2C000 cycles%2E Compatible with over 60 EF and EF%2DS lenses as well as with EOS System accessories%2C the creative opportunities %2D not just with stills but also with video %2D are beyond amazement%2E

Product Features :

  • 18.0-megapixel CMOS Sensor and Dual DIGIC 4 Image Processors for high image quality and speed
  • Kit includes 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM standard zoom lens
  • Advanced HD movie mode with manual exposure control and selectable frame rates
  • Intelligent Viewfinder with 100 percent field of view; 19-point, all cross-type AF system equipped with dual diagonal cross-type sensors
  • Capture images to CF Card Type I and II, UDMA-compliant CF cards (not included)

Canon EOS 7D 18 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-inch LCD and 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM Standard Zoom Lens – Review:

DOES THE 7D BEAT FULL FRAME CAMERAS?,

No, but it’s so good that one starts to contemplate this question, which was never the case before the 7D was introduced. Both systems, crop and full frame, have their pros and cons and place in photography. But before I get into that let me say I have not been as excited about a camera since the introduction of the 5D MK I four years ago. That’s because the 7D raises the crop camera bar to the point where crop users will not feel at a disadvantage to full frame camera users, especially if coupled with awesome ef-s lenses such as the 17-55 f2.8.

How so? The 7D sets a new standard in four major ways.

1. It produces whopping 18MP pictures, which are just 3MP shy of the current top of the line full frame Canon cameras. Just few years ago most pros were producing stellar results using the 1Ds MKII 16MP camera. Now you have more MPs in a crop sensor, that’s a major achievement. This achievement translates into bigger prints and, perhaps more importantly, cropping power. Out shooting wildlife with a 300mm instead of 400mm? You can crop the 7D files down to 50% of their original file size and still obtain sharp pictures. It’s just not that easy with the 1D MK III 10MP files.

2. Many worried that extra MPs in small crop sensors would translate into nosier pictures, but the amazing thing is that this camera produces images with what seems to be less noise than the 1Ds MKII. The noise level is very good. At ISO 1600 I still prefer pictures coming from my 5D MKII, but below ISO1600 they are very close. Frankly, I can go with either camera because most of my professionally shot portraits and product pictures are shot at ISO100. At ISO100 both produce very clean files and are practically indistinguishable.

3. Focus is the one area that was lacking on the previous 1.6 crop Canon cameras and this camera changes that. It’s not a 1D in focus speed and accuracy, but it’s the next best thing compared to them. It’s faster than the Canon 5D MKII, which is known to be slightly faster or around the focus performance range of the 50D and 40D.

4. The drive chain is fast, so fast it’s beyond anything I needed in my professional work in portrait, commercial, and product photography. Going through pictures taken at 8fps produces very little difference from frame to frame. One probably has to shoot a very fast moving subject/object to see the advantage of such fast drive system.

There are obviously many other things that I have not covered in this review. But based on the above, all I can say is that this camera has really raised the bar for all cameras and made it much more affordable to obtain a professional level camera for all types of photography. If you were considering buying the 5D MKII as an upgrade give this camera a test because it might be all you need.

As for the advantages of crop cameras I always find it odd that casual users who shoot many things but focus on landscape think they need a full frame to realize their potential. Crop cameras such as the 7D and 50D are fine for most users and offer many advantages including:

1. greater depth of field at lower aperture for landscape photography

2. greater tilt and shift effect because of sensor size relative to effect (8mm in shift is greater in effect relative to a 22mm sensor compared to a 35mm sensor)

3. greater magnification with micro lenses and extension tubes because of smaller sensor (1:1 in full frame equals 35mm, 1:1 in crop equals 22mm)

4. smaller lighter lenses with wider aperture that achieve greater reach (such as the 17-55 2.8 vs the 24-70 2.8 similar reach but much lighter and smaller)

Traditionally the three areas full frame cameras outshine crop cameras are a bigger brighter viewfinder, shallower depth of field for portrait photography, and better ISO performance, which on the last point the 7D has proven not be an issue anymore.
And for the second point really, most beautiful low depth of field portraits are done around f2.8-2.0 in full frame (going wider will make depth of field too narrow to place two eyes in focus). Hence, if one is using a wide prime, a crop sensor will produce the same depth of field at 2.0-1.4. Considering an affordable 50mm f1.4 lens on crop has the same field of view as 85mm lens on full frame there is really no reason to discount a crop camera any more as the 7D levels the playing field.

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